An analysis of debussys arabaesque

Allegretto scherzando Arabesque No. Andantino con moto[ edit ] This arabesque is in the key of E major.

An analysis of debussys arabaesque

These two arabesques are short and simple in format, but enduringly popular and gorgeous particularly the first one. For more Debussy goodness, be sure to check out the history of Debussythe music of Debussy and a closer look at the famous Clair de Lune.

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The first arabesque is the most famous, written in the key of E major. The second arabesque is fun and lively, and just as colorful as the first — though lesser known. Deux arabesques in Pop culture Like all famous classical compositions, the first arabesque is all over pop culture.

Arabesques are also usually fairly free-form.

An analysis of debussys arabaesque

The intention Debussy had with this arabesque is to create a calm and serene mood with the gently rolling left hand and cascading right hand notes. He wanted to paint a mood, not a clearly defined picture. A section We start in the key of E major. The introduction and first theme of Arabesque no.

This left hand pattern is particularly challenging when matched up with the right hand, since it involves a technique called polyrhythm — both hands playing a different rhythm.

We can hear this piece as a transition between the Romantic and Impressionist periods because of its shorter form — later Romantic music tended to be shorter like music todayand early Impressionist music used dissonance and different scales beyond the standard major and minor.

We have some long-held left-hand chord and playful right hand trills.

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Like the first arabesque, there are a bunch of modulations and key changes. The main rhythmic motive in the A section is the triplet-sixteenth-plus-eighth rhythm, which is fairly constant in the right hand. The whole effect is bubbly and childlike — very lighthearted which many of us forget that Debussy was excellent at conveying.

It is made up of colors and rhythms.Aug 03,  · I'm currently in the early stages of posting a series of articles through my music blog on the process of analysis of the Debussy piece 'Arabesque No. 1'. I'm looking very specifically at the in depth functionality of the music through a variety of analytic methods.

I thought there might be some. Taking his cue from the baroque arabesque form (a popular French dance), both of these works have something resembling a danceable form - something clearly noticed by US R&B singer-songwriter Alicia Keys, whose song .

Debussy’s Arabesque and Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloé () a ballet that critics admired for its arabesque qualities. An analysis of four dances will reveal how the distinct rhythmic and.

Arabesques and Polyrhythmic Jazz. Search this site. Introduction. Clause Debussy's "Arabesque No.1 in E Major" Mongo Santamaria's "Afro Blue" Similarities and Differences. Works Consulted. Debussy's Arabesque No.1 in E Major was written as a piece for the solo piano in the late Romantic period. An analysis of four dances will reveal how the distinct rhythmic and metric profiles of arabesque melodies portray characters and their narratives. In challenging preconceptions of ornament as marginal and meaningless, this essay shows how arabesque became endowed with structural and expressive significance at the début du siècle. T he Claude Debussy First Arabesque, composed in in the key of E major, is like an arabesque, an ornamental design consisting of intertwined flowing .

Brandy M. Winn Music Jill Oneal November 6, Debussy Arabesque, No.1 in E Debussys Arabaesque, has become one of my favorite pieces of classical Music for the simple fact that it is easy for me to identify with.

Claude Debussy's Musical Style Background Debussy provided the first real alternative to the music and style of the German Romantic Wagnerians. He established France as a musical power and opened up Western music to non-Western influences.

He drew from many sources, including: (hear Arabesque . Taking his cue from the baroque arabesque form (a popular French dance), both of these works have something resembling a danceable form - something clearly noticed by US R&B singer-songwriter Alicia Keys, whose song 'Like The Sea' samples Debussy's first arabesque.

Clause Debussy's "Arabesque No.1 in E Major" - Arabesques and Polyrhythmic Jazz